Survey Methodology

Estimating Population Quantities From Multiple Data Sources Using the Structural Tensor Factorization

Soichiro Yamauchi (Harvard University)

Abstract: Estimating population quantities such as public opinions from survey data is a fundamental task in many social science studies. In political science, there is a growing interest in estimating public opinions at the level smaller than the entire nation, such as states (Lax and Phillips...

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Latent Factor Approach to Missing Not at Random

Naijia Liu (Princeton University)

Abstract: Social scientists rely heavily on survey datasets to study important questions, such as policy preferences and voting intentions. However, it is common that respondents choose not to answer a certain question due to some unobserved confounders, thus causing ’missing not at random (MNAR)’...

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Certain. Wrong. Misinformed? Evaluating Survey-Based Measures of Political Misperceptions

Matthew Graham (Yale University)

Abstract: Survey measures of the public's factual beliefs suggest widespread misinformation on politically relevant matters of fact: not only do many Americans not only choose incorrect responses, but...

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Don’t Know, Don’t Care: Non-Attitudes in African Public Opinion

Blair Read and Paige Bollen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract: Public opinion data can contain a wealth of information about how citizens evaluate and participate in politics. Yet, often respondents refuse to answer survey questions, or simply respond “don’t know” when asked about their opinion...

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Bias-Corrected Crosswise Estimators for Sensitive Inquiries

Yuki Atsusaka (Rice University), Randy Stevenson (Rice University) and Ahra Wu (Dartmouth College)

Abstract: The crosswise model is an increasingly popular survey technique to elicit candid answers from respondents...

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